Swords Gallery

British 1796 Light Cavalry Officers Sabre by Prosser

This is an example of a 1796 light cavalry officer's sabre bearing a superb blue and gilt blade. The blade is marked J.J.Runkel, Sohlingen. It carries the pre-1801 Royal Arms as well as the 'GR' cypher for George III along with ornate floral and military decoration, and a more unusual geometrical decoration. The sword is retailed by Prosser however the cartouche on the scabbard reads PROSSER late CULLUM and bears details of the royal appointment and the address. John Prosser is described by Southwick as a shopman for Mary Cullum. James Cullum had been a swordmaker to George III and on his death in 1786 was succeeded by his sonrnreplica rolex
, Thomas. Sadly Thomas died aged 38 only 4 years later and was succeeded by his wife Mary. On Mary's death her warrant passed to one David Davies, but on 9th July 1795 a further warrant was granted appointing John Prosser as Sword Cutler and Belt Maker in Ordinary to King George III. The dating of this sword is particularly interesting. On the blade J.J.Runkel is still spelling Sohlingen with an 'h' which it is believed he discontinued around 1800. The blade also bears the pre-1801 Royal Arms. However the cartouche on the scabbard still lists the manufacturer as PROSSER late CULLUM, and as can be seen from the picture, CULLUM is in larger lettering. The royal appointment being referred to must by this time be Prosser's own but it is fascinating that even in this period of history, there was enormous value in using a well established 'brand' or name to establish and gain a reputation for quality.fake watches uk
The quality of Prosser's work and indeed his apprenticeship under Cullum can be seen from the sword itself and the date is therefore likely to be between 1796 and 1800..

Blade decoratiom 3

Blade decoration 1

Blade decoration 2

Cartouche on the scabbard

Hilt 1

Hilt 2

Inscription on the back edge of the blade

pre-1801 Royal Arms